An Abundance of Katherines…by John Green

Katherines

Colin Singleton is a child prodigy, who has been dumped by 19, yes that’s 19, girls named Katherine. He is so depressed when he is dumped by Katherine nineteen, his friend Hassan talks him into going on a road trip. They end up in Gutshot, Tennessee visiting the grave of Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

Ok, I’ll start off by saying a few years ago, my first John Green book was ‘Fault in Our Stars’ . I thought it was reasonably good but did not live up to the hype. Then I read ‘Paper Towns’. Let’s just say it has some not very nice quotes about Orlando and those of us who live here ( I heard they left those quotes out of the movie, so I must not be the only one that found the quotes not very nice).  I also felt it had no depth and little plot line. So for awhile I wasn’t interested in reading his other books.
Then I went to a book sale and teenage girls were grabbing up his books like the Zombie Apocalypse was coming and they needed reading material. So when I saw ‘An Abundance of Katherine’s’ at the library I thought, I’ll give a try. It would be an easy read.
I did like most of the characters, especially Hassan. The main character (Colin) though  is a self-centered, ego maniac, and one of the most boring characters I have ever read. He does almost nothing in the book but work out a math theorem to explain his break up with the Katherines  (yawn). The story really had no plot what-so-ever. I also felt like he was making fun of some of the southern characters and their country ways.

There were some parts that were mildly funny. There were also foot notes on most pages that were supposed to be funny  but, to me, they just seemed silly.

 Most irritating of all was the crazy over use of the following words.

  • The Theorem

  • anagram

  • Fug  ( this one especially)

  • “….” (I not even sure what this was supposed to mean)

I have heard other reviews that have said most of John Green’s book are basically the same. The the main character ,in most of this books, is a nerdy teenage boy  (i.e. himself) who wants a girl who doesn’t want him. I tend to agree.

 I may give ‘Looking for Alaska’ a try , but not holding out much hope for it. I am giving this book three stars and I feel that is generous.

 

Rating:📖📖📖